Interactions in the Labial Musculature during Speech Interactions in electromyographic activity of the upper and lower lips during speech were studied by manipulating the magnitude of bursts of activity related to bilabial closure. Four pairs of electrodes were placed in the labial musculature in each of four normal-speaking young adults. Manipulation of muscle activity usually resulted in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1988
Interactions in the Labial Musculature during Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John W. Folkins
    University of Iowa
  • Raymond N. Linville
    University of Pittsburgh
  • J. David Garrett
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Carl Kice Brown
    University of Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1988
Interactions in the Labial Musculature during Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 253-264. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.253
History: Received January 15, 1987 , Accepted September 4, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 253-264. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.253
History: Received January 15, 1987; Accepted September 4, 1987

Interactions in electromyographic activity of the upper and lower lips during speech were studied by manipulating the magnitude of bursts of activity related to bilabial closure. Four pairs of electrodes were placed in the labial musculature in each of four normal-speaking young adults. Manipulation of muscle activity usually resulted in positively correlated changes in activity recorded from the other three electrode pairs. Similar effects were found when lower lip muscle activity was manipulated and when upper lip muscle activity was manipulated, suggesting there is no asymmetry in the interactions between lips. Measurements of lower lip closing movement often correlated with the modulated muscle activity, suggesting that the size of lip opening was varied to accommodate different closing forces. The flexibility of a system producing positive correlations in the activity of different labial regions is discussed and contrasted with the suggestions that there are complementary variations, producing negative correlations, in the activity of different labial muscles during speech.

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