Laryngeal Kinematics in Voiceless Obstruents Produced by Hearing-Impaired Speakers During normal production of voiceless consonants several events occur simultaneously in the vocal tract. These events must be temporally cOordinated. Earlier work has indicated that a breakdown in interarticulator timing can contribute to the characteristic voiced-voiceless errors produced by hearing-impaired speakers. The present study examines kinematic details of the laryngeal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1988
Laryngeal Kinematics in Voiceless Obstruents Produced by Hearing-Impaired Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy S. McGarr
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT, and Graduate Center, The City University of New York
  • Anders Löfqvist
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT, and Lund University, Sweden
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1988
Laryngeal Kinematics in Voiceless Obstruents Produced by Hearing-Impaired Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 234-239. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.234
History: Received May 12, 1986 , Accepted September 3, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 234-239. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.234
History: Received May 12, 1986; Accepted September 3, 1987

During normal production of voiceless consonants several events occur simultaneously in the vocal tract. These events must be temporally cOordinated. Earlier work has indicated that a breakdown in interarticulator timing can contribute to the characteristic voiced-voiceless errors produced by hearing-impaired speakers. The present study examines kinematic details of the laryngeal articulatory gesture in 2 deaf speakers and a control subject using transillumination of the larynx. Results indicate that hearing-impaired speakers often do not produce differences between stops and fricatives in the kinematic details of the gesture. That is to say, although hearing speakers commonly use a larger laryngeal gesture for fricatives than for stops and also show durational differences of the abduction and the adduction phases between phonetic categories, the hearing-impaired subjects did not make them. Also, the deaf speakers participating in this study were more variable in the kinematic measures.

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