Volumes and Breathing Patterns during Speech in Healthy and Asthmatic Subjects The lung volumes and ventilatory patterns used by 10 healthy subjects and 14 patients with varying degrees of asthma were studied. The protocol included conversation, monologue, and counting at two loudness levels. Lung-volume changes were measured with a Respitrace and recorded with associated speech sounds. Volumes, durations, and flows were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1988
Volumes and Breathing Patterns during Speech in Healthy and Asthmatic Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert G. Loudon
    University of Cincinnati Medical Center
  • Linda Lee
    University of Cincinnati
  • Barbara J. Holcomb
    University of Cincinnati
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1988
Volumes and Breathing Patterns during Speech in Healthy and Asthmatic Subjects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 219-227. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.219
History: Received October 10, 1986 , Accepted August 28, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 219-227. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.219
History: Received October 10, 1986; Accepted August 28, 1987

The lung volumes and ventilatory patterns used by 10 healthy subjects and 14 patients with varying degrees of asthma were studied. The protocol included conversation, monologue, and counting at two loudness levels. Lung-volume changes were measured with a Respitrace and recorded with associated speech sounds. Volumes, durations, and flows were analyzed for sequences of respiratory cycles. Asthmatics used a greater percentage of their reduced vital capacity. Their inspiratory flow rates were slower, and expiratory rates faster. Asthmatics spent a greater proportion of the total respiratory cycle time on inspiration, and expired a greater volume of gas without sound. Patterns of ventilation suggested that asthmatics favored respiratory over communication needs to a greater extent than healthy subjects. Activities that forced priority to communication needs (counting to a metronome) were inadequate for gas exchange in asthmatics and could be sustained for only a limited period of time.

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