Changes in Vocal Fundamental Frequency at the Segmental Level Control During Voiced Fricatives Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1988
Changes in Vocal Fundamental Frequency at the Segmental Level
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R. J. Baken
    Teachers College, Columbia University
  • Robert F. Orlikoff
    Teachers College, Columbia University
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1988
Changes in Vocal Fundamental Frequency at the Segmental Level
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 207-211. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.207
History: Received November 20, 1986 , Accepted August 28, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 207-211. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.207
History: Received November 20, 1986; Accepted August 28, 1987

in addition to cycle-by-cycle (jitter) and long-term (intonation contour and declination) changes, vocal fundamental frequency (F0) is known to vary during moments of production of individual phones. This study explored the relationship between intra-oral pressure and F0 during the production of the English voiced fricatives /v/, /z/, /ð/, and //. Target words were embedded in a carrier phrase spoken with three different patterns of sentence stress. F0 changed at a mean rate of -3.59 Hz/cmH2O and -7.96 Hz/cmH2O in men and women, respectively. No significant difference was observed among the different fricatives nor among the several stress patterns. A significant sex effect, not observed in a prior related study, was eliminated by conversion of the F0 data to semitones. The observed magnitudes of the ratios of F0 change to pressure Change are consistent with Several earlier studies that explored the effect of passive transglottal pressure changes on F0. The present findings imply that, although F0 regulation is involved in the generation of different intonation contours, the laryngeal system is not compensated to maintain F0 in the face of the transitory changes in vocal-tract aerodynamics that accompany voiced fricative production.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access