Articulatory F0 Perturbations and Auditory Feedback Singers are required to sing with a high degree of precision of fundamental frequency (F0). Does this mean that they have learned to compensate for the change of pitch that has been described in speech during production of different vowels? Experienced choir singers sang sustained tones with a change of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1988
Articulatory F0 Perturbations and Auditory Feedback
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sten Ternström
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Johan Sundberg
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Anders Colldén
    State Conservatory of Music, Stockholm, Sweden
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1988
Articulatory F0 Perturbations and Auditory Feedback
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 187-192. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.187
History: Received August 1, 1986 , Accepted July 6, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 187-192. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.187
History: Received August 1, 1986; Accepted July 6, 1987

Singers are required to sing with a high degree of precision of fundamental frequency (F0). Does this mean that they have learned to compensate for the change of pitch that has been described in speech during production of different vowels? Experienced choir singers sang sustained tones with a change of vowel in mid-tone. The fundamental frequency was measured, and the resulting F0 contours were evaluated with respect to F0 effects coincident with the vowel changes. The tasks were performed both with normal auditory feedback and with the auditory feedback masked by noise in headphones. The vowels/i/ and/y/were found to be associated with higher F0 than other vowels. The irregularities in the F0 curves were somewhat larger in the absence of auditory feedback. This is consistent with findings during speech production. The instability in F0, measured as the standard deviation over each tone, was also larger in the absence of feedback.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access