The Effects of Different Frequency Responses on Sound Quality Judgments and Speech Intelligibility Four speech programs and two music programs were reproduced using five different frequency responses: one flat and the others combinations of reductions at lower frequencies and/or increases at higher frequencies. Twelve hearing impaired (HI) and 8 normal hearing (NH) subjects listened monaurally to the reproductions at comfortable listening level and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1988
The Effects of Different Frequency Responses on Sound Quality Judgments and Speech Intelligibility
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alf Gabrielsson
    Department of Technical Audiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm
  • Bo N. Schenkman
    Department of Technical Audiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm
  • Björn Hagerman
    Department of Technical Audiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1988
The Effects of Different Frequency Responses on Sound Quality Judgments and Speech Intelligibility
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 166-177. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.166
History: Received March 17, 1986 , Accepted June 30, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1988, Vol. 31, 166-177. doi:10.1044/jshr.3102.166
History: Received March 17, 1986; Accepted June 30, 1987

Four speech programs and two music programs were reproduced using five different frequency responses: one flat and the others combinations of reductions at lower frequencies and/or increases at higher frequencies. Twelve hearing impaired (HI) and 8 normal hearing (NH) subjects listened monaurally to the reproductions at comfortable listening level and judged the sound quality on seven perceptual scales and a scale for total impression. Speech intelligibility was measured for phonetically balanced (PB) word lists and for sentences in noise. Significant differences among the reproductions appeared in practically all scales. The most preferred system was characterized by a fiat response at lower frequencies and a 6 dB/octave increase thereafter. There were certain differences between the NH and HI listeners in the judgments of the other systems. The intelligibility of PB word lists did not differ among the systems, and the S/N threshold for the sentences in noise only distinguished the flat response as worse than all others for the HI listeners. There was little correspondence between intelligibility measures and sound quality measures. The latter provided more information and distinctions among systems.

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