Onset Sequencing of Selected Lip Muscles in Stutterers and Nonstutterers The present study examined lip muscle activity during the speech production of stutterers and fluent speakers to provide information about the nature of stuttering blocks. Depressor Anguli Oris (DAO) and Depressor Labii Inferioris (DLI) were recorded, using hooked-wire electromyography (EMG), in 3 stutterers and 3 nonstutterers during productions of the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1988
Onset Sequencing of Selected Lip Muscles in Stutterers and Nonstutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barry Guitar
    University of Vermont
  • Carroll Guitar
    University of Vermont
  • Peter Neilson
    University of New South Wales
  • Nicholas O'Dwyer
    University of New South Wales
  • Gavin Andrews
    University of New South Wales
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1988
Onset Sequencing of Selected Lip Muscles in Stutterers and Nonstutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1988, Vol. 31, 28-35. doi:10.1044/jshr.3101.28
History: Received May 15, 1986 , Accepted May 5, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1988, Vol. 31, 28-35. doi:10.1044/jshr.3101.28
History: Received May 15, 1986; Accepted May 5, 1987

The present study examined lip muscle activity during the speech production of stutterers and fluent speakers to provide information about the nature of stuttering blocks. Depressor Anguli Oris (DAO) and Depressor Labii Inferioris (DLI) were recorded, using hooked-wire electromyography (EMG), in 3 stutterers and 3 nonstutterers during productions of the words "peek", "puck", and "pack. " E M G records indicated that nonstutters activated DAO prior to DLI for production of the initial/p/. Stutterers frequently reversed this sequence of onset, particularly when they stuttered. Results are discussed in terms of mistiming versus anticipatory hypertension hypotheses about stuttering.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access