Least Mean Square Measures of Voice Perturbation A signal processing technique is described for measuring the jitter, shimmer, and signal-to-noise ratio of sustained vowels. The measures are derived from the least mean square fit of a waveform model to the digitized speech waveform. The speech waveform is digitized at an 8.3 kHz sampling rate, and an interpolation ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1987
Least Mean Square Measures of Voice Perturbation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul Milenkovic
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1987
Least Mean Square Measures of Voice Perturbation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1987, Vol. 30, 529-538. doi:10.1044/jshr.3004.529
History: Received July 25, 1986 , Accepted April 6, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1987, Vol. 30, 529-538. doi:10.1044/jshr.3004.529
History: Received July 25, 1986; Accepted April 6, 1987

A signal processing technique is described for measuring the jitter, shimmer, and signal-to-noise ratio of sustained vowels. The measures are derived from the least mean square fit of a waveform model to the digitized speech waveform. The speech waveform is digitized at an 8.3 kHz sampling rate, and an interpolation technique is used to improve the temporal resolution of the model fit. The ability of these procedures to measure low levels of perturbation is evaluated both on synthetic speech waveforms and on the speech recorded from subjects with normal voice characteristics.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access