The Effect of Stimulus Repetition Rate on the Auditory Brainstem Response in Tumor and Nontumor Patients Auditory brainstem responses were recorded in two groups of adult subjects with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss. Clicks were presented at repetition rates of 9.7, 39.7, 49.7, and 59.7/s. One group was composed of 20 patients with no known otoneurologic lesion (cochlear group), and one group was composed of 8 patients ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1987
The Effect of Stimulus Repetition Rate on the Auditory Brainstem Response in Tumor and Nontumor Patients
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathleen C.M. Campbell
    University of Iowa
  • Paul J. Abbas
    University of Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1987
The Effect of Stimulus Repetition Rate on the Auditory Brainstem Response in Tumor and Nontumor Patients
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1987, Vol. 30, 494-502. doi:10.1044/jshr.3004.494
History: Received July 25, 1986 , Accepted March 30, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1987, Vol. 30, 494-502. doi:10.1044/jshr.3004.494
History: Received July 25, 1986; Accepted March 30, 1987

Auditory brainstem responses were recorded in two groups of adult subjects with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss. Clicks were presented at repetition rates of 9.7, 39.7, 49.7, and 59.7/s. One group was composed of 20 patients with no known otoneurologic lesion (cochlear group), and one group was composed of 8 patients with a surgically confirmed acoustic neuroma in the ear with poorer hearing sensitivity (retrocochlear group). Detection of wave V at different repetition rates was not significantly different between the two groups. Average wave-V latency shift was not significantly different between the two groups as repetition rate increased from 9.7/s to 39.7/s but was significantly greater for the retroeochlear group as repetition rate increased from 9.7/s to 49.7/s and 59.7/s. However, the wave-V latency shift showed no improvement over the slow-rate interaural wave-V latency difference in discriminating between the two groups of patients. No significant correlation between the amount of wave-V latency shift and hearing loss at 2000 Hz or 4000 Hz was found for the ears with poorer hearing sensitivity.

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