A Methodological Study of Perturbation and Additive Noise in Synthetically Generated Voice Signals There is a relatively large body of research that is aimed at finding a set of acoustic measures of voice signals that can be used to: (a) aid in the detection, diagnosis, and evaluation of voice-quality disorders; (b) identify individual speakers by their voice characteristics; or (c) improve methods of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1987
A Methodological Study of Perturbation and Additive Noise in Synthetically Generated Voice Signals
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James Hillenbrand
    RIT Research Corporation and Rochester Institute of Technology, NY
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1987
A Methodological Study of Perturbation and Additive Noise in Synthetically Generated Voice Signals
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1987, Vol. 30, 448-461. doi:10.1044/jshr.3004.448
History: Received August 27, 1986 , Accepted March 3, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1987, Vol. 30, 448-461. doi:10.1044/jshr.3004.448
History: Received August 27, 1986; Accepted March 3, 1987

There is a relatively large body of research that is aimed at finding a set of acoustic measures of voice signals that can be used to: (a) aid in the detection, diagnosis, and evaluation of voice-quality disorders; (b) identify individual speakers by their voice characteristics; or (c) improve methods of voice synthesis. Three acoustic parameters that have received a relatively large share of attention, especially in the voice-disorders literature, are pitch perturbation, amplitude perturbation, and additive noise. The present study consisted of a series of simulations using a general-purpose formant synthesizer that were designed primarily to determine whether these three parameters could be measured independent of one another. Results suggested that changes in any single dimension can affect measured values of all three parameters. For example, adding noise to a voice signal resulted not only in a change in measured signal-to-noise ratio, but also in measured values of pitch and amplitude perturbation, These interactions were quite large in some cases, especially in view of the fact that the perturbation phenomena that are being measured are generally quite small. For the most part, the interactions appear to be readily explainable when the measurement techniques are viewed in relation to what is known about the acoustics of voice production.

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