Physiological Bases of Acoustic LRT in Nonstutterers, Mild Stutterers, and Severe Stutterers The simple reaction time paradigm, incorporating a variable foreperiod, was used to investigate relative contributions of the respiratory and laryngeal systems to mild and severe stutterers' prolonged acoustic laryngeal reaction time (LRT) values. Prephonatory kinematic data were analyzed in terms of frequency of initiation, timing, and organization of events executed ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1987
Physiological Bases of Acoustic LRT in Nonstutterers, Mild Stutterers, and Severe Stutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ben C. Watson
    University of Connecticut, Storrs; Haskins Laboratories, New Haven
  • Peter J. Alfonso
    University of Connecticut, Storrs; Haskins Laboratories, New Haven
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1987
Physiological Bases of Acoustic LRT in Nonstutterers, Mild Stutterers, and Severe Stutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1987, Vol. 30, 434-447. doi:10.1044/jshr.3004.434
History: Received August 8, 1985 , Accepted February 17, 1987
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1987, Vol. 30, 434-447. doi:10.1044/jshr.3004.434
History: Received August 8, 1985; Accepted February 17, 1987

The simple reaction time paradigm, incorporating a variable foreperiod, was used to investigate relative contributions of the respiratory and laryngeal systems to mild and severe stutterers' prolonged acoustic laryngeal reaction time (LRT) values. Prephonatory kinematic data were analyzed in terms of frequency of initiation, timing, and organization of events executed to attain the functional physiological targets of respiratory inflation during foreperiods and phonation onset after foreperiods. Acoustic data replicated a previously observed composite stuttering severity and foreperiod effect on stutterers' acoustic LRT values. Kinematic data revealed that, in general, the mild stutterers demonstrated delayed initiation of respiratory events and appropriate organization of respiratory and laryngeal events while the severe stutterers demonstrated delayed initiation of laryngeal events and inappropriate organization of respiratory and laryngeal events. That is, kinematic data both account for group differences in acoustic LRT values as a function of foreperiod and support the notion that differential respiratory and laryngeal deficits underly mild and severe stutterers' prolonged acoustic LRT values.

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