Aerodynamic and Myoelastic Contributions to Tracheoesophageal Voice Production Five laryngectomized, tracheoesophageal (TE) speakers completed a series of phonatory tasks developed to assess (a) aerodynamic and acoustic properties of TE voice and (b) aerodynamic and myoelastic contributions to the mediation of fundamental frequency change. These TE speakers' voices were characterized by increased trans-source airflow rates, comparable source driving pressures, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1987
Aerodynamic and Myoelastic Contributions to Tracheoesophageal Voice Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jerald B. Moon
    Thames Valley Children's Centre, London, Ontario, Canada
  • Bernd Weinberg
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1987
Aerodynamic and Myoelastic Contributions to Tracheoesophageal Voice Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1987, Vol. 30, 387-395. doi:10.1044/jshr.3003.387
History: Received January 10, 1986 , Accepted December 24, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1987, Vol. 30, 387-395. doi:10.1044/jshr.3003.387
History: Received January 10, 1986; Accepted December 24, 1986

Five laryngectomized, tracheoesophageal (TE) speakers completed a series of phonatory tasks developed to assess (a) aerodynamic and acoustic properties of TE voice and (b) aerodynamic and myoelastic contributions to the mediation of fundamental frequency change. These TE speakers' voices were characterized by increased trans-source airflow rates, comparable source driving pressures, and decreased airway resistances in comparison with standard esophageal speakers. TE speakers were capable of adjusting their voicing sources on a myoelastic basis to influence Fo change. This result, coupled with findings that confirm aerodynamic contributions to TE phonation, are intepreted to suggest that TE voice production should be regarded as an aerodynamic-myeolastic event. Findings are integrated with existing data to highlight fundamental differences among TE, esophageal, and normal voice production.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access