Different Clinical Perspectives of Good and Poor Therapy Sessions This study investigated differences in causal attributions made by student clinicians taking actor and observer roles in good and poor therapy Sessions. One hundred thirty-four graduate student clinicians in speech-language pathology were asked to imagine a hypothetical good or poor therapy session in which they took either the role of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1987
Different Clinical Perspectives of Good and Poor Therapy Sessions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne Erwick Roberts
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Vicki McCready
    University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1987
Different Clinical Perspectives of Good and Poor Therapy Sessions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1987, Vol. 30, 335-342. doi:10.1044/jshr.3003.335
History: Received March 24, 1986 , Accepted December 30, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1987, Vol. 30, 335-342. doi:10.1044/jshr.3003.335
History: Received March 24, 1986; Accepted December 30, 1986

This study investigated differences in causal attributions made by student clinicians taking actor and observer roles in good and poor therapy Sessions. One hundred thirty-four graduate student clinicians in speech-language pathology were asked to imagine a hypothetical good or poor therapy session in which they took either the role of a clinician working with a client in a session or that of a clinician observing the session. To account for the session's hypothesized outcomes, clinicians taking the actor role cited client causes more frequently than other causes while clinicians taking the observer role cited clinician causes. These results are consistent with the actor-observer bias documented extensively in the psychological and educational literatures. Clinicians' causal attributions also differed for good and poor therapy sessions. Implications are discussed in terms of possible impact on the clinical training process in speech-language pathology.

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