A Respirometric Technique to Evaluate Velopharyngeal Function in Speakers with Cleft Palate, with and without Prostheses There is a paucity of respirometric quotient (RQ) data on individuals with velopharyngeal inadequacy. Paesani (1964) reported data using a technique that involved separate productions of the same task to obtain the RQ. The RQ values obtained were greater than unity, which is theoretically impossible. In the present study, respirometric ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1987
A Respirometric Technique to Evaluate Velopharyngeal Function in Speakers with Cleft Palate, with and without Prostheses
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harvey R. Gilbert
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Carole T. Ferrand
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1987
A Respirometric Technique to Evaluate Velopharyngeal Function in Speakers with Cleft Palate, with and without Prostheses
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1987, Vol. 30, 268-275. doi:10.1044/jshr.3002.268
History: Received February 4, 1986 , Accepted December 3, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1987, Vol. 30, 268-275. doi:10.1044/jshr.3002.268
History: Received February 4, 1986; Accepted December 3, 1986

There is a paucity of respirometric quotient (RQ) data on individuals with velopharyngeal inadequacy. Paesani (1964) reported data using a technique that involved separate productions of the same task to obtain the RQ. The RQ values obtained were greater than unity, which is theoretically impossible. In the present study, respirometric quotients, the ratio of oral air volume expended to total volume expended, were obtained using separate but simultaneous productions of oral and nasal airflow. RQ values were calculated for 10 speakers with cleft palate, with and without their prosthetic appliances, and 10 normal speakers. As a group, those with cleft palate and without their appliances exhibited RQ values that were significantly lower than values obtained from the normal speakers and from speakers with the appliances in place. These findings indicated that there were no statistically significant differences in RQ values when comparing sentence repetition and counting tasks. These values were lower than those obtained for the nonnasal syllable repetition tasks, with the/m/ syllable repetition task generally being associated with the lowest RQ value of any of the speech tasks. The correlation between RQ values and perceptual judgments was -.60, indicating that there was modest agreement between the two measures. As RQ values decreased, perceptual judgments of nasality increased.

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