Some Technical Considerations in Voice Perturbation Measurements The maximum theoretical quantization noise (shimmer and jitter) for digital recording systems is estimated and compared with normal vocal shimmer and jitter. Nine bits of resolution and 500 samples per cycle are needed to minimize the contaminating sampling noise without interpolation between samples. With interpolation, however, fewer than 100 samples ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1987
Some Technical Considerations in Voice Perturbation Measurements
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ingo R. Titze
    University of Iowa, Iowa City; The Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Denver, Colorado
  • Yoshiyuki Horii
    The University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Ronald C. Scherer
    The Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Denver, Colorado
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1987
Some Technical Considerations in Voice Perturbation Measurements
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1987, Vol. 30, 252-260. doi:10.1044/jshr.3002.252
History: Received May 6, 1985 , Accepted November 18, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1987, Vol. 30, 252-260. doi:10.1044/jshr.3002.252
History: Received May 6, 1985; Accepted November 18, 1986

The maximum theoretical quantization noise (shimmer and jitter) for digital recording systems is estimated and compared with normal vocal shimmer and jitter. Nine bits of resolution and 500 samples per cycle are needed to minimize the contaminating sampling noise without interpolation between samples. With interpolation, however, fewer than 100 samples per cycle can resolve jitter down to 0.1%. Low-pass filtering is not harmful unless peak-picking strategies are used, and the peaks are severely broadened by the low-pass filter. A window of at least 20 cycles is suggested, and multiple tokens of an utterance are necessary to obtain a stable mean for perturbation measures.

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