Training Effects on Vowel Production by Two Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Speakers Two profoundly hearing-impaired adolescents received systematic speech training to improve their production of the vowels /i/ and /æ/. Acoustic measures of F1, F2, and duration, and listener judgments of vowel acceptability, were used to quantify vowel production before and after training. Both subjects demonstrated significant changes in their production of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1987
Training Effects on Vowel Production by Two Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Joe Osberger
    Boys Town National Institute, Omaha, NE
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1987
Training Effects on Vowel Production by Two Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1987, Vol. 30, 241-251. doi:10.1044/jshr.3002.241
History: Received January 10, 1986 , Accepted November 26, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1987, Vol. 30, 241-251. doi:10.1044/jshr.3002.241
History: Received January 10, 1986; Accepted November 26, 1986

Two profoundly hearing-impaired adolescents received systematic speech training to improve their production of the vowels /i/ and /æ/. Acoustic measures of F1, F2, and duration, and listener judgments of vowel acceptability, were used to quantify vowel production before and after training. Both subjects demonstrated significant changes in their production of the two vowels at the acoustic and perceptual levels following treatment. The changes were highly individualized. For some features, significant improvement occurred posttreatment with differences between the hearing-impaired subject and a control group of subjects with normal hearing no longer present. There was a significant improvement in the acceptability of the two vowels in each subject's speech after training. Vowel duration remained unchanged in the speech of one subject whereas it increased in the speech of the other subject following training. There was a trend toward reduced token-to-token variation in the posttreatment samples. Acoustic and perceptual measures also were obtained on two vowels not directly trained in the program. Significant changes occurred in the production of these segments but some of the changes resulted in greater deviation in the post- than in the pretreatment samples.

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