Tympanometric Measures of Eustachian Tube Function The purpose of this study was to develop instructions and procedures and to establish a normal data base for four tympanometric tests of Eustachian tube function: Valsalva, Toynbee, Inflation, and Deflation. Data were obtained for 24 young adults (48 ears) with normal hearing and normal middle-ear function. The tympanograms were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1987
Tympanometric Measures of Eustachian Tube Function
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Catherine L. Riedel
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
  • Terry L. Wiley
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Michael G. Block
    Indiana University, Bloomington
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1987
Tympanometric Measures of Eustachian Tube Function
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1987, Vol. 30, 207-214. doi:10.1044/jshr.3002.207
History: Received March 24, 1986 , Accepted October 23, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1987, Vol. 30, 207-214. doi:10.1044/jshr.3002.207
History: Received March 24, 1986; Accepted October 23, 1986

The purpose of this study was to develop instructions and procedures and to establish a normal data base for four tympanometric tests of Eustachian tube function: Valsalva, Toynbee, Inflation, and Deflation. Data were obtained for 24 young adults (48 ears) with normal hearing and normal middle-ear function. The tympanograms were analyzed for differences between baseline and experimental (postmaneuver) and baseline and posttest tracings for seven measures: tympanogram peak pressure, peak acoustic admittance, static acoustic admittance, negative gradient, positive gradient, and negative and positive acoustic-admittance values at ±400 daPa. The results indicated a statistically significant difference only in peak pressure for baseline and experimental tympanograms. Peak-pressure shifts were most pronounced for the Valsalva and Toynbee procedures. The small pressure shifts characteristic of the Inflation and Deflation procedures coupled with the potential for instrumental error severely limit the use of these procedures as means of obtaining reliable indices of tubal function.

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