Effect of Two Approaches to Auditory Training on Speech Recognition by Hearing-Impaired Adults Twenty adults with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing impairments were given three tests of speech recognition: the CUNY Nonsense Syllable Test (NST), the low predictability items of the Revised Speech Perception in Noise (RSPIN) test, and the high predictability items of the RSPIN test. They were tested on four occasions: ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1987
Effect of Two Approaches to Auditory Training on Speech Recognition by Hearing-Impaired Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Adrienne Rubinstein
    Brooklyn College
  • Arthur Boothroyd
    Graduate Center, City University of New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1987
Effect of Two Approaches to Auditory Training on Speech Recognition by Hearing-Impaired Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1987, Vol. 30, 153-160. doi:10.1044/jshr.3002.153
History: Received December 31, 1985 , Accepted September 24, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1987, Vol. 30, 153-160. doi:10.1044/jshr.3002.153
History: Received December 31, 1985; Accepted September 24, 1986

Twenty adults with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing impairments were given three tests of speech recognition: the CUNY Nonsense Syllable Test (NST), the low predictability items of the Revised Speech Perception in Noise (RSPIN) test, and the high predictability items of the RSPIN test. They were tested on four occasions: (a) at the beginning of the study, (b) after one month of "no treatment," (c) after a month of intensive auditory training, and (d) after a further month of "no treatment." During the treatment period, 10 of the subjects spent all of the time on activities involving sentence perception and perceptual strategy while the other 10 spent half of the time on activities involving consonant recognition. A small, but statistically significant increase in speech recognition performance on the high probability material was observed in both groups subsequent to training, but the effect of training method was not significant. In addition, the gains achieved were not lost in the month following the end of training. The findings suggest that the benefits of auditory training were found in an increased use of sentence context as an aid to word recognition.

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