Effects of Vowel Context on the Articulatory Closure Postures of Deaf Speakers Using cinefluorography, this investigation evaluated how the bilabial and dorsal stop closure postures of 2 hearing and 5 deaf speakers varied with vowel context. The jaw and tongue body postures of the hearing and the 2 most intelligible deaf speakers altered with the identity of the following vowel. This did ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1987
Effects of Vowel Context on the Articulatory Closure Postures of Deaf Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Tye-Murray
    University of Iowa Hospitals, Iowa City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1987
Effects of Vowel Context on the Articulatory Closure Postures of Deaf Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 99-104. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.99
History: Received December 6, 1985 , Accepted September 10, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 99-104. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.99
History: Received December 6, 1985; Accepted September 10, 1986

Using cinefluorography, this investigation evaluated how the bilabial and dorsal stop closure postures of 2 hearing and 5 deaf speakers varied with vowel context. The jaw and tongue body postures of the hearing and the 2 most intelligible deaf speakers altered with the identity of the following vowel. This did not occur consistently for the remaining deaf speakers. The results concur with a previous suggestion (Tye, Zimmermann, & Kelso, 1983) that some speakers who learn speech without audition may develop a different articulatory coordination than hearing speakers. Discovering these differences may lead to a general account for many of their intelligibility deficits.

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