Cohesion in the Discourse of Normal and Head-Injured Adults Cohesion strategies used by 3 normal and 3 head-injured adults were examined in both conversational and narrative conditions. Two major findings emerged. First, the head-injured subjects used different cohesion patterns from the normal adults in both conditions. Second, both groups used different cohesion patterns in the conversational and narrative conditions. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1987
Cohesion in the Discourse of Normal and Head-Injured Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michelle Mentis
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Carol A. Prutting
    University of California, Santa Barbara
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1987
Cohesion in the Discourse of Normal and Head-Injured Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 88-98. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.88
History: Received September 3, 1985 , Accepted August 22, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 88-98. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.88
History: Received September 3, 1985; Accepted August 22, 1986

Cohesion strategies used by 3 normal and 3 head-injured adults were examined in both conversational and narrative conditions. Two major findings emerged. First, the head-injured subjects used different cohesion patterns from the normal adults in both conditions. Second, both groups used different cohesion patterns in the conversational and narrative conditions. The study highlights the importance of viewing the language of head-injured adults within the context of discourse. Testing the language system through narrative as well as conversational discourse is important since both conditions are characterized by their own distinctive internal structure and organization.

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