Effects of Consonantal Context on Vowel Lipreading The effects of consonantal context on vowel lipreading were assessed for 30 adults with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss who lipread videotape recordings of two female talkers. The stimuli were the vowels /i,I,,U,u/ in symmetric CVC form with the consonants /p,b,f,v,t,d,∫,g/ and in the asymmetric consonantal contexts /h/-V-/g/, /w/-V-/g/, /r/-V-/g/. Analyses ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1987
Effects of Consonantal Context on Vowel Lipreading
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Allen A. Montgomery
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
  • Brian E. Walden
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
  • Robert A. Prosek
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1987
Effects of Consonantal Context on Vowel Lipreading
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 50-59. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.50
History: Received December 17, 1985 , Accepted August 18, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 50-59. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.50
History: Received December 17, 1985; Accepted August 18, 1986

The effects of consonantal context on vowel lipreading were assessed for 30 adults with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss who lipread videotape recordings of two female talkers. The stimuli were the vowels /i,I,,U,u/ in symmetric CVC form with the consonants /p,b,f,v,t,d,∫,g/ and in the asymmetric consonantal contexts /h/-V-/g/, /w/-V-/g/, /r/-V-/g/. Analyses of the confusion matrices from each talker indicated that vowel intelligibility was significantly poorer in most contexts involving highly visible consonants, although the utterances of one talker were highly intelligible in the bilabial context. Among the visible contexts, the fricative and labiodental contexts in particular produced the lowest vowel intelligibility regardless of talker. Lax vowels were consistently more difficult to perceive than tense vowels. Implications for talker selection and refinement of the concept of viseme were drawn.

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