Burst and Transition Cues to Voicing Perception for Spoken Initial Stops by Impaired- and Normal-Hearing Listeners The use of cues to voicing perception of initial stop consonants in multiple spoken syllables was studied for moderately/severely hearing-impaired (n = 43) and normal-hearing listeners (n = 12). The test stimuli were ten utterances each of the syllables/bæd, gæd, dæd, pæd, kæd, tæd/. The utterances were analyzed acoustically to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1987
Burst and Transition Cues to Voicing Perception for Spoken Initial Stops by Impaired- and Normal-Hearing Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sally Revoile
    Gallaudet University, Washington, DC
  • James M. Pickett
    Gallaudet University, Washington, DC
  • Lisa D. Holden-Pitt
    Gallaudet University, Washington, DC
  • David Talkin
    Gallaudet University, Washington, DC
  • Fred D. Brandt
    Gallaudet University, Washington, DC
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1987
Burst and Transition Cues to Voicing Perception for Spoken Initial Stops by Impaired- and Normal-Hearing Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 3-12. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.03
History: Received June 16, 1985 , Accepted June 10, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 3-12. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.03
History: Received June 16, 1985; Accepted June 10, 1986

The use of cues to voicing perception of initial stop consonants in multiple spoken syllables was studied for moderately/severely hearing-impaired (n = 43) and normal-hearing listeners (n = 12). The test stimuli were ten utterances each of the syllables/bæd, gæd, dæd, pæd, kæd, tæd/. The utterances were analyzed acoustically to confirm the presence of certain cues to initial-stop voicing, namely, differences in voice onset time (VOT), aspiration, and vowel-onset values of the first formant and of fundamental frequency (ƒo). Test conditions were prepared in which different portions of the syllable onsets were either deleted or interchanged for voicing-cognate syllables. Also the ƒo contour was flattened for syllable pairs via analysis/synthesis using linear predictor code (LPC) processing. The results confirmed that VOT was a strong voicing cue for both the hearing-impaired and normal-hearing listeners. When the aspirations of the voiceless stops were inserted between the release and the vowel of the voiced-stop syllables, the normal-hearing listeners perceived voiceless stops predominantly. The transition portions of the vowel onsets in burstless / bæd, gæd, dæd / contained strong cues for voicing perception of /b,g,d/. The hearing-impaired listeners seemed less sensitive than the normal-hearing listeners to the aspiration-presence and the vowel-onset cues. The ƒo difference at vowel onset appeared to have no cue value for either group of listeners.

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