Frequency Discrimination of Short- versus Long-Duration Tones by Normal and Hearing-Impaired Listeners This investigation explored the effects of stimulus level on the frequency discrimination of long- and short-duration pure tones by 5 subjects with normal hearing and 7 with sensorineural hearing impairment. Frequency difference limens (DLs) were obtained as a function of signal intensity for 5-ms and 300-ms tones at 500, 1000, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1987
Frequency Discrimination of Short- versus Long-Duration Tones by Normal and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard L. Freyman
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • David A. Nelson
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1987
Frequency Discrimination of Short- versus Long-Duration Tones by Normal and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 28-36. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.28
History: Received September 23, 1985 , Accepted August 6, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 28-36. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.28
History: Received September 23, 1985; Accepted August 6, 1986

This investigation explored the effects of stimulus level on the frequency discrimination of long- and short-duration pure tones by 5 subjects with normal hearing and 7 with sensorineural hearing impairment. Frequency difference limens (DLs) were obtained as a function of signal intensity for 5-ms and 300-ms tones at 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz. The performance of most of the hearing-impaired subjects was poorer than normal for 300-ms tones, but not for 5-ms tones. This result was relatively independent of the stimulus sensation levels at which the data were compared. However, the current results also show an unexpected dependence of the frequency DL on the sensation level of short-duration tones. In several normal-hearing subjects, frequency discrimination performance for these short tones is poorer at moderately high levels than at low levels.

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