Word and Feature Identification by Profoundly Deaf Teenagers Using the Queen's University Tactile Vocoder The experiments described are part of an ongoing evaluation of the Queen's University Tactile Vocoder, a device that allows the acoustic waveform to be felt as a vibrational pattern on the skin. Two prelingually profoundly deaf teenagers reached criterion on a 50-word vocabulary (live voice, single speaker) using information obtained ... Research Note
Research Note  |   March 01, 1987
Word and Feature Identification by Profoundly Deaf Teenagers Using the Queen's University Tactile Vocoder
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • P. L. Brooks
    Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada
  • B. J. Frost
    Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada
  • J. L. Mason
    Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada
  • D. M. Gibson
    Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada
Article Information
Research Notes
Research Note   |   March 01, 1987
Word and Feature Identification by Profoundly Deaf Teenagers Using the Queen's University Tactile Vocoder
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 137-141. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.137
History: Received October 7, 1985 , Accepted September 9, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 137-141. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.137
History: Received October 7, 1985; Accepted September 9, 1986

The experiments described are part of an ongoing evaluation of the Queen's University Tactile Vocoder, a device that allows the acoustic waveform to be felt as a vibrational pattern on the skin. Two prelingually profoundly deaf teenagers reached criterion on a 50-word vocabulary (live voice, single speaker) using information obtained solely from the tactile vocoder with 28.5 and 24.0 hours of training. Immediately following word-learning experiments, subjects were asked to place 16 CVs into five phonemic categories (voiced & unvoiced stops, voiced & unvoiced fricatives, approximants). Average accuracy was 84.5%. Similar performance (89.6%) was obtained for placement of 12 VCs into four phonemic categories. Subjects were able to acquire some general rules about voicing and manner of articulation cues.

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