An Effect of Modeling and Imitation Teaching Procedures on Children with and without Specific Language Impairment Following a treatment program in which an invented morpheme was taught through either imitation or modeling procedures, the generalization of 40 specific language-impaired children was compared to that of 40 children learning language normally. The results of the comparison indicated that the two teaching procedures have opposite relative effects on ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1987
An Effect of Modeling and Imitation Teaching Procedures on Children with and without Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Phil J. Connell
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1987
An Effect of Modeling and Imitation Teaching Procedures on Children with and without Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 105-113. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.105
History: Received October 28, 1985 , Accepted September 10, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1987, Vol. 30, 105-113. doi:10.1044/jshr.3001.105
History: Received October 28, 1985; Accepted September 10, 1986

Following a treatment program in which an invented morpheme was taught through either imitation or modeling procedures, the generalization of 40 specific language-impaired children was compared to that of 40 children learning language normally. The results of the comparison indicated that the two teaching procedures have opposite relative effects on the two groups. The abnormal group generalized more extensively following imitation teaching while the normal group generalized more extensively following modeling teaching. The opposing results of the two procedures on the two groups suggest that language-impaired children will benefit more from teaching strategies that are adapted to their unique learning styles than from strategies fashioned after the styles of children who learn language normally.

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