Scale Composition and Item Analysis of the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired The Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired (CPHI) is a self-assessment inventory that provides 25 scores describing the Communication Performance, Communication Environment, Communication Strategies, and Personal Adjustment of hearing-impaired adults (Demorest & Erdman, 1986). Description of the content and measurement objective for each scale is given and an analysis of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1986
Scale Composition and Item Analysis of the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marilyn E. Demorest
    University of Maryland Baltimore County, Catonsville
  • Sue Ann Erdman
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1986
Scale Composition and Item Analysis of the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1986, Vol. 29, 515-535. doi:10.1044/jshr.2904.535
History: Received March 10, 1986 , Accepted June 20, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1986, Vol. 29, 515-535. doi:10.1044/jshr.2904.535
History: Received March 10, 1986; Accepted June 20, 1986

The Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired (CPHI) is a self-assessment inventory that provides 25 scores describing the Communication Performance, Communication Environment, Communication Strategies, and Personal Adjustment of hearing-impaired adults (Demorest & Erdman, 1986). Description of the content and measurement objective for each scale is given and an analysis of the psychometric properties of the 145 items in the CPHI is presented. Results are based on a sample of 433 active-duty military personnel tested at Walter Reed Army Medical Center during the final phase of CPHI development. Included are frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, item-total correlations, and factor structure of the items within each scale and across scales within each of the areas assessed by the CPHI. Applications of these data in clinical interpretation, construct validation, and further development of the CPHI scales are discussed.

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