Characteristics of Speech Production after Tracheoesophageal Puncture Voice Onset Time and Vowel Duration Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1986
Characteristics of Speech Production after Tracheoesophageal Puncture
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne Robbins
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • John Christensen
    University of Tulsa, OK
  • Gail Kempster
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1986
Characteristics of Speech Production after Tracheoesophageal Puncture
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1986, Vol. 29, 499-504. doi:10.1044/jshr.2904.499
History: Received July 22, 1985 , Accepted May 23, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1986, Vol. 29, 499-504. doi:10.1044/jshr.2904.499
History: Received July 22, 1985; Accepted May 23, 1986

Voice onset time (VOT) and vowel duration characteristics of speakers following the Singer-Blom technique of tracheoesophageal puncture (1980) were compared to those of traditional esophageal and laryngeal speakers. Fifteen subjects in each of the three speaker groups produced the words /pik/, /kup/, and /kup/ in a carrier phrase while audio recordings were obtained. Broadband spectrograms were made of the consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) utterances and vowel duration and VOT were measured. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) procedures revealed that the tracheoesophageal speakers produced significantly shorter VOTs and longer vowel durations than the laryngeal speakers. However, the longer vowel durations for the traeheoesophageal speakers were not completely accounted for by the shorter VOTs found for that group. Spectrographic examination suggests that delayed voice offset time for the tracheoesophageal speakers also contributes to their longer vowel durations. Overall findings indicate that the physical characteristics and motor control properties of the neoglottis, even when driven by pulmonary air as in tracheoesophageal speakers, exert a major influence on alaryngeal voice production.

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