Teaching Subjecthood to Language-Disordered Children Four language-disordered children who had not learned subject properties such as agreement morphemes, nominative case,and question inversion were taught the function of subjects in sentences. After learning subject function, the children learned the subject properties without assistance. The findings suggest that subject properties can be taught as a unit and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1986
Teaching Subjecthood to Language-Disordered Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Phil J. Connell
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1986
Teaching Subjecthood to Language-Disordered Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1986, Vol. 29, 481-492. doi:10.1044/jshr.2904.481
History: Received April 15, 1985 , Accepted April 16, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1986, Vol. 29, 481-492. doi:10.1044/jshr.2904.481
History: Received April 15, 1985; Accepted April 16, 1986

Four language-disordered children who had not learned subject properties such as agreement morphemes, nominative case,and question inversion were taught the function of subjects in sentences. After learning subject function, the children learned the subject properties without assistance. The findings suggest that subject properties can be taught as a unit and their acquisition follows the two-step pattern that is predicted by the functional theory of language. The findings suggest that the functional theory has diagnostic and treatment implications for clinical work with language-disordered children.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access