Tinnitus as a Source of Internal Noise For 7 patients with sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus, pitch and loudness matches were made to the tinnitus. These matches were followed by measurement of three psychometric functions (probability of a correct response as a function of signal level) for pure tones, one in the presumed tinnitus region (i.e., at ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1986
Tinnitus as a Source of Internal Noise
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. J. Penner
    University of Maryland, College Park
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1986
Tinnitus as a Source of Internal Noise
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1986, Vol. 29, 400-406. doi:10.1044/jshr.2903.400
History: Received October 3, 1985 , Accepted March 24, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1986, Vol. 29, 400-406. doi:10.1044/jshr.2903.400
History: Received October 3, 1985; Accepted March 24, 1986

For 7 patients with sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus, pitch and loudness matches were made to the tinnitus. These matches were followed by measurement of three psychometric functions (probability of a correct response as a function of signal level) for pure tones, one in the presumed tinnitus region (i.e., at the average frequency matching the pitch of the tinnitus), one below the minimum frequency of the matches, and one above the maximum frequency of the matches. The data reveal (a) that pitch-loudness matches are usually quite variable and (b) that the slope of the psychometric function is flattest in the presumed tinnitus region. The first result is consistent with the idea that tinnitus is an unstable signal. The second result is consistent with the notion that the unstable tinnitus acts as a source of "internal" noise.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access