Studies in Stuttering as a Prosodic Disturbance In two experiments, various aspects of prosody in adult male stutterers and nonstutterers were studied. The results showed that (a) stutterers did not speak with a generally reduced pitch pattern, (b) they were able to place sentence accent correctly but had difficulty executing this prosodic feature, (c) stuttering episodes were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1986
Studies in Stuttering as a Prosodic Disturbance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Günther Bergmann
    University of Giessen, West Germany
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1986
Studies in Stuttering as a Prosodic Disturbance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1986, Vol. 29, 290-300. doi:10.1044/jshr.2903.290
History: Received December 3, 1984 , Accepted December 17, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1986, Vol. 29, 290-300. doi:10.1044/jshr.2903.290
History: Received December 3, 1984; Accepted December 17, 1985

In two experiments, various aspects of prosody in adult male stutterers and nonstutterers were studied. The results showed that (a) stutterers did not speak with a generally reduced pitch pattern, (b) they were able to place sentence accent correctly but had difficulty executing this prosodic feature, (c) stuttering episodes were located mainly on stressed syllables, (d) a fixed timing pattern of speech enhanced fluency, and (e) the intervals between stressed syllables were more variable in the speech of stutterers, even in symptom-free passages, than in the speech of nonstutterers. Results support the conclusion that stuttering, seen on the symptomatic level of disfluencies produced, is a prosodic disturbance.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access