Use of a Monosyllabic Adaptive Speech Test (MAST) with Young Children Sixty children aged 3, 5, and 7 years were tested using a simple up-down adaptive speech threshold procedure. The test stimuli were familiar monosyllabic words presented as a closed set with a picture-pointing response. The results indicate that monosyllabic adaptive speech test (MAST) procedures can be used reliably with children ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 1986
Use of a Monosyllabic Adaptive Speech Test (MAST) with Young Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kerrie Mackie
    National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, Australia
  • Phillip Dermody
    National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, Australia
Article Information
Research Notes
Research Note   |   June 01, 1986
Use of a Monosyllabic Adaptive Speech Test (MAST) with Young Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1986, Vol. 29, 275-281. doi:10.1044/jshr.2902.275
History: Received August 1, 1984 , Accepted December 5, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1986, Vol. 29, 275-281. doi:10.1044/jshr.2902.275
History: Received August 1, 1984; Accepted December 5, 1985

Sixty children aged 3, 5, and 7 years were tested using a simple up-down adaptive speech threshold procedure. The test stimuli were familiar monosyllabic words presented as a closed set with a picture-pointing response. The results indicate that monosyllabic adaptive speech test (MAST) procedures can be used reliably with children as young as 3 years of age. Thirty of the children also received a different randomization of the same speech stimuli presented at a constant level, equal to their MAST threshold. The results confirmed the accuracy of the MAST estimate of the children's 50% speech threshold. Further support for the validity of the MAST threshold procedure with young children was obtained using a group of 10 children with conductive hearing loss. Their results show a significant correlation between the MAST threshold and pure-tone loss. The data also indicated significant improvement in MAST thresholds over the three age groups investigated. These developmental changes are discussed in terms of a word frequency effect.

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