A Comparison of Temporal Measures of Speech Using Spectrograms and Digital Oscillograms To determine whether any systematic differences occur as a result of using spectrograms versus digital oscillograms to make durational measurements, a number of temporal features (e.g., voice onset time, vowel duration, and consonant closure duration) for 3 speakers were independently measured by 2 different investigators. Both experimenters measured the same ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 1986
A Comparison of Temporal Measures of Speech Using Spectrograms and Digital Oscillograms
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bruce L. Smith
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • James Hillenbrand
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Dennis Ingrisano
    University of Northern Colorado, Greeley
Article Information
Research Notes
Research Note   |   June 01, 1986
A Comparison of Temporal Measures of Speech Using Spectrograms and Digital Oscillograms
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1986, Vol. 29, 270-274. doi:10.1044/jshr.2902.270
History: Received May 29, 1985 , Accepted January 6, 1986
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1986, Vol. 29, 270-274. doi:10.1044/jshr.2902.270
History: Received May 29, 1985; Accepted January 6, 1986

To determine whether any systematic differences occur as a result of using spectrograms versus digital oscillograms to make durational measurements, a number of temporal features (e.g., voice onset time, vowel duration, and consonant closure duration) for 3 speakers were independently measured by 2 different investigators. Both experimenters measured the same intervals with conventional spectrograms and with digital oscillograms, separated by at least a 2-week interval. Oscillograms tended to reveal slightly longer vowel durations and more voicing during consonant closure, while spectrograms evidenced slightly longer consonant closure durations. In general, variations between the two types of instrumentation were no more than 8 to 10 ms and are, therefore, of primary consequence only for studies in which quite small temporal differences are critical.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access