Relationship between Intraoral Air Pressure and Vocal Intensity in Children and Adults Intraoral air pressure (P0) varies as a function of age. Specifically, children produce significantly higher P0 values than adults. The higher P0 produced by children has been discussed in relation to age-related volumetric differences of the subglottal and vocal tract, to lung compression differences, and to the fact that children's ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1986
Relationship between Intraoral Air Pressure and Vocal Intensity in Children and Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elaine T. Stathopoulos
    State University of New York at Buffalo
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1986
Relationship between Intraoral Air Pressure and Vocal Intensity in Children and Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1986, Vol. 29, 71-74. doi:10.1044/jshr.2901.71
History: Received January 2, 1985 , Accepted September 16, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1986, Vol. 29, 71-74. doi:10.1044/jshr.2901.71
History: Received January 2, 1985; Accepted September 16, 1985

Intraoral air pressure (P0) varies as a function of age. Specifically, children produce significantly higher P0 values than adults. The higher P0 produced by children has been discussed in relation to age-related volumetric differences of the subglottal and vocal tract, to lung compression differences, and to the fact that children's "comfortable" speaking level might exceed that of adults. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the hypothesis that children (vs. adults) and women (vs. men) produce higher P0 values when sound pressure level (SPL) is held constant. Measurements were made of P0 generated by children and adults during a connected speech task completed at three intensity levels. The findings of the study indicated that (a) peak P0 values increased as vocal intensity increased for all subject groups, (b) peak P0 values were higher for voiceless stops than for voiced stops, and (c) peak P0 values were not significantly different for adults than for children or for men than for women. These results were interpreted to show that despite physical and physiological differences between male and female, and between adult and child vocal tracts, all groups use the same P0 mechanism for achieving a given vocal intensity level.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access