Speech Waveform Perturbation Analysis A Perceptual-Acoustical Comparison of Seven Measures Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1986
Speech Waveform Perturbation Analysis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anders G. Askenfelt
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Britta Hammarberg
    Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1986
Speech Waveform Perturbation Analysis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1986, Vol. 29, 50-64. doi:10.1044/jshr.2901.50
History: Received September 26, 1984 , Accepted September 10, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1986, Vol. 29, 50-64. doi:10.1044/jshr.2901.50
History: Received September 26, 1984; Accepted September 10, 1985

The performance of seven acoustic measures of cycle-to-cycle variations (perturbations) in the speech waveform was compared. All measures were calculated automatically and applied on running speech. Three of the measures refer to the frequency of occurrence and severity of waveform perturbations in special selected parts of the speech, identified by means of the rate of change in the fundamental frequency. Three other measures refer to statistical properties of the distribution of the relative frequency differences between adjacent pitch periods. One perturbation measure refers to the percentage of consecutive pitch period differences with alternating signs. The acoustic measures were tested on tape recorded speech samples from 41 voice patients, before and after successful therapy. Scattergrams of acoustic waveform perturbation data versus an average of perceived deviant voice qualities, as rated by voice clinicians, are presented. The perturbation measures were compared with regard to the acoustic-perceptual correlation and their ability to discriminate between normal and pathological voice status. The standard deviation of the distribution of the relative frequency differences was suggested as the most useful acoustic measure of waveform perturbations for clinical applications.

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