Intraoral Air Pressure and Oral Air Flow Under Different Bleed and Bite-Block Conditions Intraoral pressures and oral flows were measured as normal talkers produced /p/ and /si/ under experimental conditions that perturbed the usual aeromechanical production characteristics of the consonants. A translabial pressure-release device was used to bleed off intraoral pressure during /p/. Bite—blocks were used to open the anterior bite artificially during ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1986
Intraoral Air Pressure and Oral Air Flow Under Different Bleed and Bite-Block Conditions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne H.B. Putnam
    The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
  • Ralph L. Shelton
    The University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Charles U. Kastner
    The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1986
Intraoral Air Pressure and Oral Air Flow Under Different Bleed and Bite-Block Conditions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1986, Vol. 29, 37-49. doi:10.1044/jshr.2901.37
History: Received November 14, 1984 , Accepted September 10, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1986, Vol. 29, 37-49. doi:10.1044/jshr.2901.37
History: Received November 14, 1984; Accepted September 10, 1985

Intraoral pressures and oral flows were measured as normal talkers produced /p/ and /si/ under experimental conditions that perturbed the usual aeromechanical production characteristics of the consonants. A translabial pressure-release device was used to bleed off intraoral pressure during /p/. Bite—blocks were used to open the anterior bite artificially during /s/. For /p/, intraoral pressure decreased and translabial air leakage increased as bleed orifice area increased. For /s/, flow increased as the area of sibilant constriction increased, but differential pressure across the /s/ oral constriction did not vary systematically with changes in its area. Flow on postconsonantal vowels // and /i/ did not vary systematically across experimental conditions. The data imply that maintenance of perturbed intraoral pressure was more effective when compensatory options included opportunity for increased respiratory drive and structural adjustments at the place of consonant articulation rather than increased respiratory drive alone.

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