Middle-Latency and 40-Hz Auditory Evoked Responses in Normal-Hearing Subjects Click and 500-Hz Thresholds Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1986
Middle-Latency and 40-Hz Auditory Evoked Responses in Normal-Hearing Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul Kileny
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Susan L. Shea
    Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1986
Middle-Latency and 40-Hz Auditory Evoked Responses in Normal-Hearing Subjects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1986, Vol. 29, 20-28. doi:10.1044/jshr.2901.20
History: Received April 18, 1985 , Accepted August 21, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1986, Vol. 29, 20-28. doi:10.1044/jshr.2901.20
History: Received April 18, 1985; Accepted August 21, 1985

Click and 500-Hz tone-burst thresholds were determined by four independent judges from sequentially recorded auditory brain stem responses—middle-latency responses (ABR-MLR)—and from 40-Hz event-related potentials (ERP) in 10 normal-hearing subjects. The thresholds determined from the two electrophysiologic methods were compared to each other and to behavioral pure-tone thresholds by means of matched-pair t tests ( ⩽ .016 for each comparison). Thresholds estimated from both techniques closely approximated behavioral audiometric thresholds. The general trend was for the 40-Hz ERP thresholds to be lower than the MLR thresholds. However, the statistical analysis indicated that the differences between the two electrophysiologic thresholds and pure-tone audiometric thresholds were not significant. At threshold, the amplitudes of the 40-Hz ERPs were almost twice as large as the MLR amplitudes for clicks and only slightly larger than the MLR amplitudes for the 500-Hz tone-bursts. It was concluded that the MLR and the 40-Hz ERP techniques are equally viable procedures for threshold estimation in adults.

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