Categorical Perception of Speech Sounds via the Tactile Mode The usefulness of tactile devices as aids to lipreading has been established. However, maximum usefulness in reducing the ambiguity of lipreading cues and/or use of tactile devices as a substitute for audition may be dependent on phonemic recognition via tactile signals alone. In the present study, a categorical perception paradigm ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 1985
Categorical Perception of Speech Sounds via the Tactile Mode
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Jane Collins
    University of lowa, Iowa City
  • Richard R. Hurtig
    University of lowa, Iowa City
Article Information
Research Notes
Research Note   |   December 01, 1985
Categorical Perception of Speech Sounds via the Tactile Mode
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1985, Vol. 28, 594-598. doi:10.1044/jshr.2804.594
History: Received February 8, 1985 , Accepted July 7, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1985, Vol. 28, 594-598. doi:10.1044/jshr.2804.594
History: Received February 8, 1985; Accepted July 7, 1985

The usefulness of tactile devices as aids to lipreading has been established. However, maximum usefulness in reducing the ambiguity of lipreading cues and/or use of tactile devices as a substitute for audition may be dependent on phonemic recognition via tactile signals alone. In the present study, a categorical perception paradigm was used to evaluate tactile perception of speech sounds in comparison to auditory perception. The results show that speech signals delivered by tactile stimulation can be categorically perceived on a voice-onset time (VOT) continuum. The boundary for the voiced-voiceless distinction falls at longer VOTs for tactile than for auditory perception. It is concluded that the procedure is useful for determining characteristics of tactile perception and for prosthesis evaluation.

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