Effects of Monitoring Vocal Intensity on Oral Air Flow in Children and Adults The purposes of the present investigation were (a) to determine whether child and adult oral air flow data were parallel across two monitoring methods, (b) to determine whether an instruction to speak at a "comfortable effort level" resulted in greater variability of peak oral air flow (V0) than visual monitoring ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 1985
Effects of Monitoring Vocal Intensity on Oral Air Flow in Children and Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elaine T. Stathopoulos
    State University of New York at Buffalo
Article Information
Research Notes
Research Note   |   December 01, 1985
Effects of Monitoring Vocal Intensity on Oral Air Flow in Children and Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1985, Vol. 28, 589-593. doi:10.1044/jshr.2804.589
History: Received November 16, 1984 , Accepted June 27, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1985, Vol. 28, 589-593. doi:10.1044/jshr.2804.589
History: Received November 16, 1984; Accepted June 27, 1985

The purposes of the present investigation were (a) to determine whether child and adult oral air flow data were parallel across two monitoring methods, (b) to determine whether an instruction to speak at a "comfortable effort level" resulted in greater variability of peak oral air flow (V0) than visual monitoring of vocal intensity level, and (c) to expose possible sources of variation introduced by visual monitoring. Peak V0 from children and adults was measured for stops and fricatives in connected speech during a "comfortable-effort-level" task and during a visually monitored vocal intensity task. The lack of an age-by-monitoring effect in the analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that child and adult data were parallel. The nonsignificance of F-Max scores for testing across-subject variability showed that the natural maintenance of a comfortable intensity level did not produce greater V0 variance than visual monitoring. This result was extended by a within-subjects comparison: visual monitoring induced subjects to alter their V0 production for some phonemes. Although the V0 of voiced consonants increased only slightly from comfort-level to visual monitoring, the V0 of voiceless consonants increased more sharply. Thus, visual monitoring does not decrease V0 variability, and does introduce spurious V0 values for some consonants.

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