Effects of Feedback Filtering on Nasalization and Self-Perception of Nasality The effects of feedback filtering on nasality perception were investigated by having speakers produce sentences while hearing their voices unfiltered and low-pass filtered with cut-off frequencies of 1000, 500, and 300 Hz. As they spoke, speakers judged the nasality in their productions using a ratio scale. Measurements of nasalization were ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 1985
Effects of Feedback Filtering on Nasalization and Self-Perception of Nasality
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cecile M. Burzynski
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Clark D. Starr
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Article Information
Research Notes
Research Note   |   December 01, 1985
Effects of Feedback Filtering on Nasalization and Self-Perception of Nasality
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1985, Vol. 28, 585-588. doi:10.1044/jshr.2804.585
History: Received September 12, 1984 , Accepted June 6, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1985, Vol. 28, 585-588. doi:10.1044/jshr.2804.585
History: Received September 12, 1984; Accepted June 6, 1985

The effects of feedback filtering on nasality perception were investigated by having speakers produce sentences while hearing their voices unfiltered and low-pass filtered with cut-off frequencies of 1000, 500, and 300 Hz. As they spoke, speakers judged the nasality in their productions using a ratio scale. Measurements of nasalization were made with a miniature accelerometer attached to the side of the speaker's nose. Data obtained indicate that the speakers decreased their nasalization slightly when they heard their voices low-pass filtered at each cut-off frequency. However, they did not perceive consistent changes in their own nasality during the filtered conditions. These findings are interpreted as suggesting that nasalization is influenced by filtering air-conducted auditory information and that relationships between the acoustic correlates of nasalization and self-perception of nasality are complex.

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