Response Strength of Young Children in Operant Audiometry An operant conditioning discrimination paradigm was evaluated in terms of relationships between response behavior of young children and two stimulus components of the paradigm, the discriminative stimulus (DS) and the reinforcing stimulus (RS). Experiment I measured response performance in normal 1-year-old subjects as a function of differences in intensity and/or ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1985
Response Strength of Young Children in Operant Audiometry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael A. Primus
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Gary Thompson
    University of Washington, Seattle
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1985
Response Strength of Young Children in Operant Audiometry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1985, Vol. 28, 539-547. doi:10.1044/jshr.2804.539
History: Received August 27, 1984 , Accepted June 27, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1985, Vol. 28, 539-547. doi:10.1044/jshr.2804.539
History: Received August 27, 1984; Accepted June 27, 1985

An operant conditioning discrimination paradigm was evaluated in terms of relationships between response behavior of young children and two stimulus components of the paradigm, the discriminative stimulus (DS) and the reinforcing stimulus (RS). Experiment I measured response performance in normal 1-year-old subjects as a function of differences in intensity and/or complexity among three DSs. Results showed no significant differences in conditioning rate, habituation, or consistency of the conditioned response relative to variable properties of the DS. Experiment II examined response performance of normal 2-year-old children as a function of two modifications in the RS, reinforcement schedule and reinforcement novelty. Subjects reinforced on a variable-ratio schedule of intermittent reinforcement and subjects reinforced on a 100% schedule demonstrated equivalent response habituation and consistency. In the second part of the experiment, subjects receiving novel RSs showed significantly greater response recovery than subjects reinforced with familiar RSs. Comparison of normal 1- and 2-year-old children revealed similar rates of conditioning and response consistency. However, 2-year-olds habituated more rapidly than 1-year-olds.

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