Phonetic Speech Perception Deficits in Dyslexia Adult developmental dyslexics showed deficits in the identification of the vowels of English when the sole acoustic cues were steady-state formant frequency patterns. Deficits in the identification of place of articulation of the English stop-consonants [b], [d] and [g] in syllable-initial position were also observed. The average vowel error rate ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1985
Phonetic Speech Perception Deficits in Dyslexia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Philip Lieberman
    Brown University, Providence, RI
  • Robert H. Meskill
    Brown University, Providence, RI
  • Mary Chatillon
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  • Helaine Schupack
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1985
Phonetic Speech Perception Deficits in Dyslexia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1985, Vol. 28, 480-486. doi:10.1044/jshr.2804.480
History: Received April 2, 1984 , Accepted May 29, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1985, Vol. 28, 480-486. doi:10.1044/jshr.2804.480
History: Received April 2, 1984; Accepted May 29, 1985

Adult developmental dyslexics showed deficits in the identification of the vowels of English when the sole acoustic cues were steady-state formant frequency patterns. Deficits in the identification of place of articulation of the English stop-consonants [b], [d] and [g] in syllable-initial position were also observed. The average vowel error rate was 29%. The average consonantal error rate was 22%. These error rates are significantly different from those of nondyslexic control groups (p < .01). No single deficit characterized the entire group of dyslexic subjects. The pattern of errors with respect to place of articulation also varied for different groups of subjects. Three dyslexics have high vowel error rates and low consonantal error rates. The data are consistent with the premise that dyslexic subjects may have different perceptual deficits rather than a general auditory deficit involving the rate at which they can process perceptual information. The clinical histories of the present subjects suggest genetic transmission of these speech perception deficits. The presence of genetic variation in the biological substrate relevant to the perception of human speech should be further explored.

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