Empty Speech in Alzheimer's Disease and Fluent Aphasia Fourteen measures of empty speech during a picture description task were examined in four subject groups—patients with Alzheimer's dementia, Wernicke's aphasias, anomic aphasias, and normal controls—to discover if these groups could be distinguished on the basis of their discourse. Patients with Alzheimer's dementia were distinguished from patients with Wernicke's aphasia ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1985
Empty Speech in Alzheimer's Disease and Fluent Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marjorie Nicholas
    Boston University and VA Medical Center, Boston, MA
  • Loraine K. Obler
    Boston University and VA Medical Center, Boston, MA
  • Martin L. Albert
    Boston University and VA Medical Center, Boston, MA
  • Nancy Helm-Estabrooks
    Boston University and VA Medical Center, Boston, MA
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1985
Empty Speech in Alzheimer's Disease and Fluent Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1985, Vol. 28, 405-410. doi:10.1044/jshr.2803.405
History: Received August 14, 1984 , Accepted April 25, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1985, Vol. 28, 405-410. doi:10.1044/jshr.2803.405
History: Received August 14, 1984; Accepted April 25, 1985

Fourteen measures of empty speech during a picture description task were examined in four subject groups—patients with Alzheimer's dementia, Wernicke's aphasias, anomic aphasias, and normal controls—to discover if these groups could be distinguished on the basis of their discourse. Patients with Alzheimer's dementia were distinguished from patients with Wernicke's aphasia by producing more empty phrases and conjunctions, whereas patients with Wernicke's aphasia produced more neologisms, and verbal and literal paraphasias. The demented patients shared many empty speech characteristics with patients with anomic aphasia. Naming deficits, as measured by confrontation naming tasks, did not correlate with empty discourse production. Our findings may be useful clinically for distinguishing these different patient groups.

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