Acoustic Dimensions of Hearing-Impaired Speakers' Intelligibility Regression and principal components analyses were employed to study the relationship between three measures of speech intelligibility and 12 segmental, prosodic, and hearing ability parameters in 20 severely to profoundly hearing-impaired speakers. Regression analyses on the original 12 parameters revealed that cognate pair voice onset time differences and mean sentence ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1985
Acoustic Dimensions of Hearing-Impaired Speakers' Intelligibility
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dale Evan Metz
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY
  • Vincent J. Samar
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY
  • Nicholas Schiavetti
    State University of New York, Geneseo
  • Ronald W. Sitler
    State University of New York, Geneseo
  • Robert L. Whitehead
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1985
Acoustic Dimensions of Hearing-Impaired Speakers' Intelligibility
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1985, Vol. 28, 345-355. doi:10.1044/jshr.2803.345
History: Received September 24, 1984 , Accepted May 17, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1985, Vol. 28, 345-355. doi:10.1044/jshr.2803.345
History: Received September 24, 1984; Accepted May 17, 1985

Regression and principal components analyses were employed to study the relationship between three measures of speech intelligibility and 12 segmental, prosodic, and hearing ability parameters in 20 severely to profoundly hearing-impaired speakers. Regression analyses on the original 12 parameters revealed that cognate pair voice onset time differences and mean sentence duration strongly predicted speech intelligibility based on readings of isolated word and contextual speech material. A principal components analysis derived four factors that accounted for the majority of the variance in the original 12 parameters. Subsequent regression analyses using the four factors as predictor variables revealed two factors with strong relationships to the speech intelligibility measures. One factor primarily reflected segmental production processes related to the temporal and spatial differentiation of phonemes, whereas the other factor reflected prosodic features and production stability. These results are consistent with prior research that suggests independent primary and secondary roles for segmental and prosodic speech characteristics, respectively, in determining intelligibility in severely to profoundly hearing-impaired speakers.

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