Correspondence between an Accelerometric Nasal/Voice Amplitude Ratio and Listeners' Direct Magnitude Estimations of Hypernasality Miniature accelerometers were used to transduce nasal and anterior-neck tissue vibrations of 12 hypernasal and 3 normal children. The accelerometric voltages provided an analog implementation of Horii's (1980) nasal/voice ratio. Simultaneous audio recordings were later evaluated for hypernasality by listeners. Listeners' direct magnitude estimations (DME) of hypernasality were highly correlated ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1985
Correspondence between an Accelerometric Nasal/Voice Amplitude Ratio and Listeners' Direct Magnitude Estimations of Hypernasality
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Margaret A. Redenbaugh
    The Mason Clinic, Seattle, WA
  • Alan R. Reich
    University of Washington, Seattle
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1985
Correspondence between an Accelerometric Nasal/Voice Amplitude Ratio and Listeners' Direct Magnitude Estimations of Hypernasality
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1985, Vol. 28, 273-281. doi:10.1044/jshr.2802.273
History: Received August 17, 1984 , Accepted February 5, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1985, Vol. 28, 273-281. doi:10.1044/jshr.2802.273
History: Received August 17, 1984; Accepted February 5, 1985

Miniature accelerometers were used to transduce nasal and anterior-neck tissue vibrations of 12 hypernasal and 3 normal children. The accelerometric voltages provided an analog implementation of Horii's (1980) nasal/voice ratio. Simultaneous audio recordings were later evaluated for hypernasality by listeners. Listeners' direct magnitude estimations (DME) of hypernasality were highly correlated with the accelerometric nasal/voice ratio when the stimulus sentences contained obstruents, nonnasal semivowels, and vowels. No correlation existed between DME and accelerometric values when the stimulus sentences contained primarily nasal semivowels and vowels.

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