Tympanometric and Acoustic-Reflex Studies in Neonates Tympanograms and acoustic reflexes for a broadband noise and for a 1000-Hz tone were measured in normal neonates. Notched tympanograms were typical of neonatal ears for a 220-Hz probe tone. A single-peaked tympanogram was most characteristic for a probe frequency of 660 Hz. Ipsilateral and contralateral acoustic reflexes were present ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1985
Tympanometric and Acoustic-Reflex Studies in Neonates
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara H. Sprague
    Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston
  • Terry L. Wiley
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Robert Goldstein
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1985
Tympanometric and Acoustic-Reflex Studies in Neonates
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1985, Vol. 28, 265-272. doi:10.1044/jshr.2802.265
History: Received February 22, 1984 , Accepted January 10, 1985
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1985, Vol. 28, 265-272. doi:10.1044/jshr.2802.265
History: Received February 22, 1984; Accepted January 10, 1985

Tympanograms and acoustic reflexes for a broadband noise and for a 1000-Hz tone were measured in normal neonates. Notched tympanograms were typical of neonatal ears for a 220-Hz probe tone. A single-peaked tympanogram was most characteristic for a probe frequency of 660 Hz. Ipsilateral and contralateral acoustic reflexes were present more frequently for a 660-Hz probe tone compared to a 220-Hz probe tone, but acoustic-reflex thresholds were not significantly different between probe tones. As with adults, acoustic-reflex thresholds for the noise were significantly lower than for the tone, and ipsilateral reflex thresholds were lower than contralateral reflex thresholds. Reliability of acoustic-reflex and tympanometric measures was high. Age change from 2 to 4 days had no significant effect on tympanometric or acoustic-reflex characteristics. There was no apparent relation between tympanometric pattern and acoustic-reflex characteristics.

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