Speaking Clearly for the Hard of Hearing I Intelligibility Differences between Clear and Conversational Speech Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1985
Speaking Clearly for the Hard of Hearing I
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael A. Picheny
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge
  • Nathaniel I. Durlach
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge
  • Louis D. Braida
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1985
Speaking Clearly for the Hard of Hearing I
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1985, Vol. 28, 96-103. doi:10.1044/jshr.2801.96
History: Received October 6, 1983 , Accepted July 19, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1985, Vol. 28, 96-103. doi:10.1044/jshr.2801.96
History: Received October 6, 1983; Accepted July 19, 1984

This paper is concerned with variations in the intelligibility of speech produced for hearing-impaired listeners under two conditions. Estimates were made of the magnitude of the intelligibility differences between attempts to speak clearly and attempts to speak conversationally. Five listeners with sensorineural hearing losses were tested on groups of nonsense sentences spoken clearly and conversationally by three male talkers as a function of level and frequency-gain characteristic. The average intelligibility difference between clear and conversational speech averaged across talker was found to be 17 percentage points. To a first approximation, this difference was independent of the listener, level, and frequency-gain characteristic. Analysis of segmental-level errors was only possible for two listeners and indicated that improvements in intelligibility occurred across all phoneme classes.

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