Prephonatory Laryngeal and Chest Wall Dynamics The timing of prephonatory movements of the larynx, rib cage, and abdomen was examined in order to gain insight into the contribution of the vocal folds to the posturing of the chest wall. A simple stimulus-response paradigm was used in eliciting brief utterances—/α/ and /hα/—from six adult males. Chest wall ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1985
Prephonatory Laryngeal and Chest Wall Dynamics
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephen A. Cavallo
    Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ
  • R. J. Baken
    Teachers College, Columbia University, NY
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1985
Prephonatory Laryngeal and Chest Wall Dynamics
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1985, Vol. 28, 79-87. doi:10.1044/jshr.2801.79
History: Received November 7, 1983 , Accepted September 6, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1985, Vol. 28, 79-87. doi:10.1044/jshr.2801.79
History: Received November 7, 1983; Accepted September 6, 1984

The timing of prephonatory movements of the larynx, rib cage, and abdomen was examined in order to gain insight into the contribution of the vocal folds to the posturing of the chest wall. A simple stimulus-response paradigm was used in eliciting brief utterances—/α/ and /hα/—from six adult males. Chest wall movements were observed using mercury strain gages while simultaneous electroglottographic and airflow records provided information about vocal fold behavior. Independence of prephonatory laryngeal and chest wall behavior was demonstrated. Laryngeal adjustment preceded the start of vocal fold oscillation by a constant amount of time, whereas the time of onset of the chest wall adjustment varied as a function of the utterance type. The qualitative characteristics of prephonatory chest wall posturing were unaffected by altering glottal configuration requirements. Rib cage enlargement occurred during postural adjustment while the vocal folds were abducted (in preparation for/h/). This implies that rib cage enlargement during prephonatory chest wall posturing was not a passive response to abdominal compression.

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