Relationships between the Perception of Nasalization and Speech Movements in Speakers with Cleft Palate The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between several temporal measures of speech movements and perceived nasalization in speakers with cleft palate. Four adult subjects with repaired cleft palate were filmed using high-speed (100 frames/s) cinefluorography as they produced target syllables embedded in a carrier phrase. Perceived ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1985
Relationships between the Perception of Nasalization and Speech Movements in Speakers with Cleft Palate
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael P. Karnell
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • John W. Folkins
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Hughlett L. Morris
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1985
Relationships between the Perception of Nasalization and Speech Movements in Speakers with Cleft Palate
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1985, Vol. 28, 63-72. doi:10.1044/jshr.2801.63
History: Received October 26, 1983 , Accepted September 5, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1985, Vol. 28, 63-72. doi:10.1044/jshr.2801.63
History: Received October 26, 1983; Accepted September 5, 1984

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between several temporal measures of speech movements and perceived nasalization in speakers with cleft palate. Four adult subjects with repaired cleft palate were filmed using high-speed (100 frames/s) cinefluorography as they produced target syllables embedded in a carrier phrase. Perceived nasalization of each extracted acoustic target syllable was rated by 18 trained judges. Movements of the tongue tip, tongue dorsum, jaw, velar knee, velar tip, and posterior pharyngeal wall were plotted over time. Time of movement onsets and movement offsets was identified from the plots. Voice onset and offset times were identified from the synchronized acoustic recordings. The findings indicate that normally expected velopharyngeal movements occurred near the time of jaw-lowering onset during nasalized CVC and CVN productions in two subjects who were judged to exhibit high levels of nasalization. The other two subjects showed no velopharyngeal movements during the CVC production. It is speculated that velopharyngeal movements normally expected in CVC utterances may be avoided by some speakers with cleft palate in order to minimize perceptible nasalization.

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