Primary Modality for Speech Perception in Children with Normal and Impaired Hearing The relationships between each of seven predictor variables and the relative degree to which 84 normal and hearing-impaired children used audition or vision in their perception of word stimuli were investigated. The children's relative use of audition or vision was assessed by the auditory-visual presentation of monosyllabic word stimuli in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1985
Primary Modality for Speech Perception in Children with Normal and Impaired Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard C. Seewald
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Mark Ross
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Thomas G. Giolas
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • A. Yonovitz
    University of Texas Health Science Center of Houston
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1985
Primary Modality for Speech Perception in Children with Normal and Impaired Hearing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1985, Vol. 28, 36-46. doi:10.1044/jshr.2801.36
History: Received December 22, 1983 , Accepted August 8, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1985, Vol. 28, 36-46. doi:10.1044/jshr.2801.36
History: Received December 22, 1983; Accepted August 8, 1984

The relationships between each of seven predictor variables and the relative degree to which 84 normal and hearing-impaired children used audition or vision in their perception of word stimuli were investigated. The children's relative use of audition or vision was assessed by the auditory-visual presentation of monosyllabic word stimuli in which the visual word stimuli were in conflict with those presented acoustically. Six of the seven predictor variables were significantly correlated with the performance scores obtained within the auditory-visual conflict condition. Only pure-tone average hearing level and auditory word identification performance, however, made unique contributions toward predicting the degree to which audition or vision was used in the perception of the word stimuli. We concluded that the relative use of audition or vision was almost completely related to their auditory capabilities as represented by the children's unaided threshold sensitivity and aided speech reception performance.

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