Visual Matching Test-Taking Strategies Used by Deaf Readers Earlier investigations of deaf students' test-taking strategies have described visual matching strategies consisting generally of locating a word in the question, locating the same word in the text, and selecting a response in visual proximity to that word. Studies to date have utilized multiple-choice measures. The present investigation sought to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1985
Visual Matching Test-Taking Strategies Used by Deaf Readers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol LaSasso
    Gallaudet College, Washington, DC
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1985
Visual Matching Test-Taking Strategies Used by Deaf Readers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1985, Vol. 28, 2-7. doi:10.1044/jshr.2801.02
History: Received May 10, 1983 , Accepted January 26, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1985, Vol. 28, 2-7. doi:10.1044/jshr.2801.02
History: Received May 10, 1983; Accepted January 26, 1984

Earlier investigations of deaf students' test-taking strategies have described visual matching strategies consisting generally of locating a word in the question, locating the same word in the text, and selecting a response in visual proximity to that word. Studies to date have utilized multiple-choice measures. The present investigation sought to confirm and extend earlier findings by (a) determining whether visual matching test-taking strategies are used by deaf students in testing situations requiring them to generate responses; (b) describing these strategies, if found; (c) determining whether visual matching is related to overall test performance of deaf readers; and (d) determining whether there are differences between the strategies used by deaf and hearing readers with comparable SAT-HI reading comprehension test performance. The results of this investigation indicate extensive use of visual matching test-taking strategies by deaf subjects but not by hearing subjects. The extent of strategy use was not related to deaf subjects' overall performance on the lookback test. Nine variations of strategy were identified and described. Implications are drawn for teachers, researchers, and other practitioners working with deaf children.

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